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Welcome fellow family history buffs!
-Grant



Below are clickable links to ship's manifest images for the Lusitiania
departing on 18 September 1909 from Liverpool arriving at Ellis Island on 24 September 1909.

Thank you so much for finding the Nils (Nels) / Lusitania information!!
Lusitania

Lusitania
S/S Lusitania
Built by Brown & Co at Glasgow, Scotland, 1907 for the Cunard Line. 31,550 gross tons; 762 feet long; 87 feet wide. The Lusitania was one of only fourteen ever built four stackers. The machinery marked the Lusitania as a pioneer in maritime history. She had four direct acting steam turbines of the Parsons type, and had four propellers, with 3 blades each. The ship's quadruple screw propulsion unit was driven by direct drive steam turbines which developed some 68,000 IHP and, revolving at 180 rpm, which gave the ship a speed of 25 knots. 2,165 passengers (563 first class, 464 second class, 1,138 third class.) She had seven decks for the use of passengers.

On May 1, 1915 the Lusitania departed from New York for Queenstown and Liverpool, carrying 1,959 passengers. Many of the passengers were American citizens going on visit to Europe. On May 7th, off the Old Head of Kinsale, the Lusitania was torpedoed by the German submarine, U-20. She sank in 18 minutes. 1,195 people drowned, 123 of them were American citizens. Germany had warned the Americans against taking passage on British ships, but the incident contributed to the rise of American sentiment in favor of entering WWI on the side of the Allies.


Click on thumbnail images below to view manifests in a new window.
Image files are large and may take minutes to load.

Nels 1 of 2 Nels 2 of 2
Nels1 Nels2






Below are clickable links to ship's manifest images for the Kristianiafjord
departing on 05 May 1915 from Bergen arriving at Ellis Island on 16 May 1915.


Kristainiafjord

Kristainiafjord
S/S Kristianiafjord in Stavanger harbor
Built by Cammell Laird & Company, Birkenhead, England, 1913. 10,669 gross tons; 530 feet long; 61 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw. Service speed 15 knots. 1,200 passengers (100 first class, 250 second class, 850 third class).

Built for Norwegian-America Line, Norwegian flag, in 1913 and named Kristianiafjord. Oslo-New York service. Wrecked off England in 1917.


Click on thumbnail images below to view manifests in a new window.
Image files are large and may take minutes to load.

Oline-Anna Marie 1 of 2 Oline-Anna Marie 2 of 2
Oline-Anna Marie1 Oline-Anna Marie2







Below are clickable links to ship's manifest images for the Bergensfjord
departing on 07 Aug 1920 from Kristiania (Oslo) arriving at Ellis Island on 16 Aug 1920.


Bergensfjord

Bergensfjord
S/S Bergensfjord [old postcard]
Built by Cammell Laird & Company, Birkenhead, England, 1913. 11,013 gross tons; 530 feet long; 61 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw. Service speed 15 knots. 1,200 passengers (100 first class, 250 second class, 850 third class).

Built for Norwegian-America Line, Norwegian flag, in 1913 and named Bergensfjord. Oslo-New York service. Troopship 1940-46. Sold to Home Lines, Panamanian flag, in 1946 and renamed Aregentina. Mediterranean-South America and Mediterranean-New York service. Sold to Zim Line, Israeli flag, in 1953 and renamed Jerusalem. Mediterranean-New York service. Renamed Aliya in 1957. Laid up 1958-59. Scrapped in Italy in 1959.


Click on thumbnail images below to view manifests in a new window.
Image files are large and may take minutes to load.

Alfred-Lina 1 of 2 Alfred-Lina 2 of 2
Alfred-Lina1 Alfred-Lina2
Martha-Anna 1 of 2 Martha-Anna 2 of 2
Martha-Anna1 Martha-Anna2
Nels-Ellen 1 of 1
Nels-Ellen1



For fascinating reading with on-board pictures of the Kristianiafjord & Bergensfjord, go to:

Norway Heritage - Hands Across the Sea





The Turnquists come from Sandviken, Sweden - home of the world famous Sandvik Steel Works, founded 1858.


Sanvik Steel
Swedes holding Sandvik Steel
Luckily, nobody has put their tongue on it.
Yet.


Sanvik Steel
Even though Sven was told not to,
he just couldn't help himself.